Night of the Invasive Plants!

A freshwater aquatic and terrestrial food-web.

Image via Wikipedia

Here’s the trick:  How to coax kids into learning about the web of natural systems–the “hierarchy of complex pattern and process” (as ecology is defined).

Ken Lonnquist has been practicing that sleight-of-hand for years.  He’s a songwriter, and friend, whose creative attack [read: wicked fun sense of humor] is as smart and subversive as can be.  The kind of guy whose mind gushes reams of witty lyrics, seemingly without strain.

Take the subject of invasive plant species.  Ken’s take was to make it into a horror movie soundtrack–complete with creepy theremin sounds.

Ken is widely-known for his environmental residencies in schools, which center around his talent for creating stories and songs with the kids–and so the outcome of every workshop is a slew of new songs.  This was one.

Last week I get an email from Ken–with a youtube video embedded–and this msg:  Here’s a video made by the Invasive Plant Council of British Columbia, using artwork by kids submitted for an awareness-raising contest.  The guy called me up and asked if they could use the song, and… it turned out pretty cool!

How and where did the kids in BC hear Ken’s song?

A group called “IPAW” (Invasive Plants Association of Wisconsin) posted it on their  website (with permission, thanks!) and the other fellow saw it there. The web… is amazing that way, no?

Yes.  Go see the “Night of the Invasive Plants” video!

***

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About John Wackman

A writer since I learned to hold a pencil (no, not like that...hold it like this!). Writer/producer for television, now all media--plus a student in massage therapy. We're all re-inventing ourselves. It's a sci-fi world, isn't it?
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One Response to Night of the Invasive Plants!

  1. jwackman says:

    See this article in yesterday’s NY Times: “Mother Nature’s Melting Pot” by anthropologist Hugh Raffles.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/03/opinion/03Raffles.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=hugh%20raffles&st=cse
    Yes to the ever-changing resiliency of ecosystems. But I wonder if Hugh has ever tried to go swimming in a lake choked with milfoil?

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